A Portrait of Highcliffe

£5.95 £3.00

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A Portrait of Highcliffe

£5.95 £3.00

Now containing over 50 photographs of Highcliffe and its now lost surrounding estates and houses – Hoburne House, Saulfland, Nea House , Belvedere, Wolhayes, Beacon House.

Description

Sheila D. Herringshaw
144 Pages | over 50 b/w illustrations

210x148mm, Paperback
9781897887417

An updated version of this popular book, originally published by Sheila Herringshaw in 1981 and reprinted in 1989. This new and enlarged edition contains additional chapters bringing the story of Highcliffe up to date.

Now containing over 50 photographs of Highcliffe and its now lost surrounding estates and houses – Hoburne House, Saulfland, Nea House , Belvedere, Wolhayes, Beacon House.

Extract from Chapter One – THE BEGINNINGS

During the Second World War wounded servicemen came to Bournemouth to recuperate. Many were invited by Mrs Stuart Wortley to visit Highcliffe Castle . They found there in the quiet beauty of the place an uplifting of the spirit as well as healing of the body. Following an enquiry by medical authorities after the war, it was found that this part of the coast possessed very special healing qualities which helped the wounded to return to health remarkably quickly. This fact was related by Lady Violet Stuart Wortley in her book Grow old along with me .

The area to be explored in this book is bounded in the north by the railway line which was built at the end of the 19th century. The eastern boundary is the Walkford Brook which flows through the wooded ravine of Chewton Bunny – a local name for a glen. The western boundary starts at the railway bridge and the Lyndhurst Road (A35) to the Somerford Roundabout, along the Highcliffe Road, turning right into Bure Lane and to the sea.

The ancient history of Highcliffe can only be traced through brief references in documents and records. In the 18th century there were three group of cottages or hamlets at Chewton, Chewton Common and Slop Pond.The first semblance of a village in the centre of the area rejoiced in the name of Slop Pond. This was a group of mud walled and thatched roof cottages built at the side of the track from Christchurch to Lymington.

Additional information

Weight 1 kg
Dimensions 21 x 15 x 1 cm

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