Hordle and The Great War

£8.00

Out of stock

Hordle and The Great War

£8.00

These men deserve to be remembered as individuals, rather than just names on the local War Memorial or in church Memorial plaques.

Out of stock

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Description

John Cockram, Peggy and Jude James and
Richard Williams
100 Pages | over 100 b/w illustrations

297x210mm, Paperback

9780954097241

Hordle War Memorial includes the names of 31 servicemen from the village who died in the Great War. For whatever reason, 6 other men – Pat Glass, Bill Ireland, Harry James, Bill Matthews, Bill Saunders and Harold Way – were all born or resident in Hordle and also died, but are not so honoured . They are, however, included in this book.
These 37 men all served in the army. They came from widely differing socio-economic backgrounds, but each death was a personal tragedy to their family and friends. World War II bombing has ensured that more documentation has survived for officers, rather than men, as the records were stored in different locations. Again, more information has been forthcoming where relatives have been found, but it should not be inferred that the more complete a memorial the more important that man is. The aim for each person is to link them with the village, give a flavour of their service and explain the circumstances leading to each death.
In many ways these men were different in degree to the modern serviceman. Life in a village, on the land, was hard. Creature comforts were fewer, work was very physical, food not always abundant and the social order different. Only 3 men out of every 9 who were inspected by medical boards in the war were fit enough for immediate enlistment. It was a literate generation, much addicted to letter writing and card sending. One problem was that there was an increasing lack of understanding between a soldiers’ direct experience of war and their family’s perception of it gleaned from newspapers. Soldiers on leave or on discharge found it difficult to talk of their experiences except to their mates of the trenches, who could understand. The ones that did volunteer for service seem, by and large, to have physically benefited from the regular food, exercise and discipline. Yet to survive for up to four years of trench warfare, perhaps wounded, gassed, subjected to illness or exposed to harsh weather, as many of them were, is difficult to understand. Even more difficult to comprehend is how they coped with post-war traumatic stress disorders without adequate financial compensation, counselling or a National Health Service.
These men deserve to be remembered as individuals, rather than just names on the local War Memorial or in church Memorial plaques.

Additional information

Weight 2 kg
Dimensions 30 x 21 x 5 cm

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